Mobile home in Brittany for holiday rental

Landudec (25km from Quimper), Finistère, Brittany Reference: BF003391 Advertiser since: 27 September 2013
Property Board Arrival Bedrooms Sleeps Bathrooms Additional info
Domaine De Bel Air ***** Self Catering Saturday 2 6 1 Pull out double bed in lounge

About this property

Very Comfortable Mobile Home on Super 5* Site. This mobile home is in a coastal village setting.

Our Mobile home is situated on the 5* Bel Air leisure park which is free to campsite residents. The leisure park offers large waterslides, bouncy castles trampolines, ball pits, climbing frame, swings toboggan, large lake for either fishing or boating pedalos, volleyball, slides. The Mobile home is adjacent to the 2 swimming pools both equipped with jet spa and fountains and a toddler pool which are situated at the top of the campsite

There is an extensive range of activities already on site at Camping Bel-Air. For the aquatic minded there are heated indoor and outdoor swimming pools situated at the top of the campsite. Whilst the waterslides and water tunnels are situated at the bottom of the campsite which is Parc Loisirs (leisure park).
 
Set in rolling Breton countryside about 12 minutes drive to the nearest beaches and 12 miles west of Quimper. Thanks to the fantastic adjoining leisure park, which is free to those staying on the site, this is a childs paradise for old and young alike! It offers a variety of activities including an aqua complex with waterslides, pedal cars, bouncy castles, karting, trampolines, tennis, mini-golf and pedalos on the fully supervised lake. There are large carp in the lake for those wishing to attempt to catch them. Picnic tables by the fishing lake allow you to relax while your children are busy playing. 
 
"Midas II" is a Atlas "Bellisimo" double glazed mobile home, 28' x 12' consisting of a central lounge, dining area, kitchen, large shower room, separate wc and 2 bedrooms. Within the lounge there is a fully sprung "put-u-up" double bed to accommodate 2 further people, making it suitable for up to 6 people. Outside there is a large timber decking with a shed to the rear containing the bbq and chairs etc.

Type

Mobile home

Kitchen and dining

The kitchen is fully equipped to cater in comfort with microwave, full size fridge-freezer, 4 ring Calor gas hob and oven selection of cooking pans, toaster and electric kettle. The mobile home has all the desired crockery, cooking utensils, cutlery.

Living rooms

The lounge area has seating around 2 sides with space for the dining table and chairs. Additionally, a further 2 folding chairs are available if necessary situated in the shed. In the lounge there is a flat screen tv with integrated dvd, which is connected to the satellite dish giving UK freeview television plus a selection of dvds. In the unlikely event that it gets a little chilly in the evening, there is an electric fire in the lounge area. The double doors lead onto the large decking patio.

Bedrooms

The bedrooms are separated by the lounge, situated either end of the home, both of which are fitted with mosquito and black-out screens over the windows. The main bedroom has a double bed with shelves, double door wardrobe, and drawers under the dressing table mirror. The second bedroom has 2 single beds, (which can be put together) with shelving over the beds together with a cupboard to hang clothes. Both have electric sockets.

Bathrooms

Large walk-in shower with vanity sink unit, with a separate toilet.

Heating

Electric heater in lounge.

Entertainment

There is an extensive range of activities already on site at Camping Bel-Air. For the aquatic minded there are heated indoor and outdoor swimming pools situated at the top of the camp-site. Whilst the waterslides and water tunnels are situated at the bottom of the camp-site which is Parc Loisirs (leisure park).

Set in rolling Breton countryside about 12 minutes drive to the nearest beaches and approximately 15km west of Quimper. Thanks to the fantastic adjoining leisure park, which is FREE to those staying on the site, this is a childs paradise for old and young alike! It offers a variety of activities including an aqua complex with waterslides, pedal cars, bouncy castles, karting, trampolines, tennis, mini-golf and pedalos on the fully supervised lake. There are large carp in the lake for those wishing to attempt to catch them. Picnic tables by the fishing lake allow you to relax while your children are busy playing.

Garden and outside

Mobile home is sited on its own pitch. The pitches are separated by hedges, in countryside setting.

Parking and garages

Parking space for one car at each mobile home.

Visitor suitability

Family site, also ideal for couples out of season and can be used as a base to explore the beautiful countryside and many excellent beaches where the local people are very friendly.

Information about any additional facilities

There are a number of mobile homes on site yet the owner has created a warm, and welcoming atmosphere. The camping area is terraced and arranged in avenues with wide access roads giving a spacious feel. Pitches are flat and grassy, hedged by pretty shrubs and flowers and are at least 120m², making this site a great choice for families. There is a new aqua complex with indoor and outdoor pools.

A range of entertainment is organised in high season such as quiz competitions, karaoke, circus nights and discos.

There are additional washing facilities on the campsite a launderette that has 5 washing machines. Tokens can be obtained at the reception that cost 5 Euros each. There are 3 clothes dryers that can be used which also cost 5 Euros per load. As well as ironing facilities. There are additional toilets and hot water showers blocks situated around the site.

At the reception you will find stamps and post cards available for purchase together with washing and drying tokens. There is a carousel with information leaflets and maps of the region on places to visit. Internet access is also available on site, please ask for details at reception. The reception personnel are multi lingual speaking English, French and Dutch. Adjoining the reception area is a small precinct containing a coffee shop and restaurant, a take-away for such things as Pizzas, Frites etc. A small general store is close by on site in high season for bread, milk, butter and wine etc, should you not wish to go to the local Super-U supermarket in the village which is a mile away.

Facilities

  • Internet

  • No smoking

  • Child facilities

  • Splash pool

  • Indoor pool

Activities

Antiques/Brocante Market

Name of nearest antiques/brocante market: Pont Criox
Distance: 8 km

Cycling

Family activities

Fishing nearby

Species of fish: Large carp
Name of nearest fishing location: At campsite

Fishing on-site

Golf

Name and address of nearest golf course: Benodet
Distance: 30 km

Walking

Name/number of nearest marked trail: Discover 3 of the Landudec country walks

The Owner Recommends

Audierne

Beautiful fishing port of Audierne, Though on the whole the exposed south western extremities of Brittany are not areas you'd immediately associate with a classic summer sun-and-sand holiday, AUDIERNE, 25km west of Douarnenez on the Bay of Audierne, is an exception. An active fishing port, specialising in prawns and crayfish, it spreads along the northern shore of the Goyen estuary a short way back from the sea. At the inland end of town, a new aquarium holds tankfuls of mostly local fish, captioned as ever with the stress on gastronomy.

Concarneau

The first sizeable town you come to east of Bénodet is CONCARNEAU, where the third most important fishing port in France, which is also a small but diverse holiday resort. This town's greatest asset is its Ville Close, the small and very well-fortified old city located a few metres offshore on an irregular rocky island in the bay. it's a real delight. Like those of the citadelle at Le Palais on Belle-Île. Vauban completed its ramparts in the seventeenth century. The island itself, however, had been inhabited for at least a thousand years before that, and is first recorded as the site of a priory founded by King Gradlon of Quimper. Concarneau boasts that it is a ville fleurie, and the flowers are most in evidence inside the walls, where climbing roses and clematis swarm all over the various gift shops, restaurants and crêperies. Walk the central pedestrianized street to the far end, and you can pass through a gateway to the shoreline to watch the fishing boats go by.

Locronan

The world heritage centre of LOCRONAN, a short way from the sea on the minor road that leads down from the Crozon peninsula, is a prime example of a Breton town that has remained frozen in its ancient form by more recent economic decline. From 1469 through to the seventeenth century, it was a successful centre for woven linen, supplying sails to the French, English and Spanish navies. Film directors love its authenticity, even if Roman Polanski, filming Tess, deemed it necessary to change all the porches, put new windows on the Renaissance houses, and bury the main square in mud to make it all look a bit more English.

Musee du Bateau, Pointe du Raz

Its centrepiece, the Musée du Bateau doubles as a working boatyard, where visitors can watch or join in the construction of seagoing vessels, using techniques from all over the world and from all different periods. When the Port-Musée first opened, it was possible to roam in and out of all the boats in the port itself. Sadly, however, although you can still admire them from the quayside all year, for no charge, only three remain accessible, during only those hours (and months) when the museum is open. Of the three separate harbour areas in Douarnenez, the most appealing is the rough-and-ready port de Rosmeur, on the east side, which is nominally the fishing port used by the smaller local craft.

Pointe du Raz

The Pointe du Raz – the Land's End of both Finistère and France – has recently been designated as a "Grande Site National", and with its former military installations now thankfully cleared away it makes a dramatic spectacle. You can walk out to the plummeting fissures of the pointe, filling and draining with a deafening surf-roar, and beyond, high above on precarious paths. On the way to Pointe due Raz, is the biscuit factory, a must do experience! Even today, significant quantities of tuna, sardines and assorted crustaceans are still landed at the port of DOUARNENEZ, in the superbly sheltered Baie de Douarnenez, south of the Crozon peninsula, to keep the largest fish canneries in Europe busy. However, the catch has been declining ever since 1923, when eight hundred fishing boats brought in 100 million sardines during the six-month season. Over the last twenty years or so, Douarnenez has therefore set out – at phenomenal expense, the subject of considerable local controversy – to redefine itself as a living museum of all matters maritime. Since 1993, Port-Rhû, on the west side of town, has been designated as the Port-Musée, with its entire waterfront taken up with fishing and other vessels gathered from throughout northern Europe.

Pont l'Abbé

Pont-l'Abbé (in Breton, Pont-n'-Abad, 8,400 inhabitants) is the capital of Pays Bigouden, a traditional district located in southern Brittany (Cornouaille). The town of Pont-l'Abbé is located between the end of the estuary of the Rivière de Pont-l'Abbé. The town has a castle dating from the 14th Century. As the centre of Pays Bigouden, Pont-l'Abbé has two museums dedicated to the Bigouden culture: the Musée Bigouden was set up in 1955 in the castle of Pont, and the Maison du Pays Bigouden was inaugurated in 1984 in the Kerazegan farm. The most famous element of the Bigouden culture is the headdress. The monument aux Bigoudens, built in Pont-l'Abbé by F. Bazin in 1931, shows relatively small headdresses (10 cm-high). The headdresses seem to have increased only after the Second World War, but are hardly seen today, except in religious and folkloric festivals.

Quayside at Pointe du Raz

Its quayside – far from totally commercialized, but holding a reasonable number of cafés and restaurants – curves between a pristine wooded promontory to the right and the fish canneries to the left, which continue around the north of the headland. The various beaches around town look pretty enough, but are dangerous for swimming.

Quimper

Quimper, capital of the ancient diocese, kingdom and later duchy of Cornouaille, is the oldest Breton City. According to legend, the first bishop of Quimper, St Corentin, came with the first Bretons across the Channel sometime between the fourth and seventh centuries to the place they named Little Britain. A relaxed kind of place, modern Quimper is still active enough to have the bars – and the atmosphere – to make it worth going out café-crawling. "The charming little place" known to Flaubert takes at most half an hour to cross on foot. The town's name comes from "kemper", denoting the junction of two rivers, the Steir and the Odet, around which are the cobbled streets (now mainly pedestrianized) of the medieval quarter, dominated by the cathedral nearby. As the Odet curves from east to southwest it's crossed by numerous low, flat bridges, bedecked with geraniums and chrysanthemums in the autumn. You can stroll along the boulevards on both banks of the river, where several ultramodern edifices blend in a surprisingly harmonious way with their ancient – and attractive – surroundings. Overlooking all are the wooded slopes of Mont Frugy. There's no great pressure in Quimper to rush around monuments or museums, and the most enjoyable option may be to take a boat and drift down "the prettiest river in France" to the open sea at Bénodet.

The Baie des Trépassés (Bay of the Dead)

The Baie des Trépassés (Bay of the Dead), 30km west of Douarnenez, gets its grim name from the shipwrecked bodies that are washed up there, and is a possible site of the lost city of Ys. However, it's a very attractive spot of green meadows, too exposed to support trees, which end abruptly on the low cliffs to either side, a huge expanse of flat sand (in fact little else at low tide), and crashing waves that thrash surfers and windsurfers to within an inch of their lives. Beyond the waves, you can usually make out the white-painted houses along the harbour on the Île de Sein, while the various uninhabited rocks in between hold a veritable forest of lighthouses.