Spacious farmhouse holiday rental in Normandy

2km from Percy, Manche, Normandy Reference: NM004258 Advertiser since: 27 July 2015
Property Board Arrival Bedrooms Sleeps Bathrooms Additional info
La Maison Du Chene Self Catering Saturday 6 12 5 2 Z-Beds can be provided if required

About this property

A very spacious Renovated 18th Century Farmhouse. This cottage/gite is in a coastal setting.

A very spacious  renovated 18th century Farmhouse. This house comprises of six bedrooms that can all be either double or single beds. (All beds are zip/link divans).  Four of the bedrooms are en suite and the other two share a shower room.  The house is set in an acre of land. This property is absolutely ideal for large families and groups of friends.

Type

Cottage/Gite

Kitchen and dining

large fully fitted kitchen Dishwasher, washing machine, large fridge/freezer, wine cooler, farmhouse table seats 6/8

Separate dining room large table seats up-to 16

Living rooms

Sitting room with comfy sofas and armchairs, open plan through to dining area.

Large lounge with woodburner comfy sofas and chairs, flat screen tv, cd player.

Bedrooms

1st Master bedroom with en-suite bathroom/ full-size bath & wc
2nd Master bedroom with en-suite/full-size bath & wc
3rd Double or twin bedroom with en-suite shower room & wc
4th Double or twin bedroom shared shower room & wc
5th Twin bedroom with en-suite shower room and wc
6th Twin bedroom with en-suite shower room and wc

Bathrooms

5 in total 3 with walk in showers and 2 with full size baths.

Heating

Central heating throughout house and wood-burner in lounge

Entertainment

Lots of books/games, flat screen tv with free to air English speaking channels.
2 cd players 1 in lounge and 1 in dining room

Garden and outside

Children's swings, bbq area, seating and garden table for 12.
Large back and front of house garden area, fenced in paddock at front of house with children's games i.e football nets.

Parking and garages

Private drive and parking for plenty of cars

Visitor suitability

Access may be difficult for certain disabilities, stairs to all bedrooms and bathrooms.

Information about any additional facilities

Free wi-fi

Facilities

  • Internet

  • Linen

  • Child facilities

Activities

Mountain biking

Distance: 3 km

About the Owner, Mrs Jackie Mold

Year property purchased 2007
Why this location? We bought the house in this location because the area is so beautiful, with wonderful beaches and a fantastic history, all within an hours drive.
Unique benefits of property The house has two master bedrooms and a fully stocked kitchen with all the equipment needed for real food lovers who enjoy cooking.

The Owner Recommends

D-Day landing beaches

The Normandy landings (codenamed Operation Neptune) were the landing operations on 6 June 1944 (termed D-Day) of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. The largest seaborne invasion in history, the operation began the liberation of German-occupied northwestern Europe from Nazi control, and contributed to the Allied victory on the Western Front. Planning for the operation began in 1943. In the months leading up to the invasion, the Allies conducted a substantial military deception, codenamed Operation Bodyguard, to mislead the Germans as to the date and location of the main Allied landings. The weather on D-Day was far from ideal, but postponing would have meant a delay of at least two weeks, as the invasion planners had requirements for the phase of the moon, the tides, and the time of day that meant only a few days in each month were deemed suitable. Hitler placed German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel in command of German forces and of developing fortifications along the Atlantic Wall in anticipation of an Allied invasion. The amphibious landings were preceded by extensive aerial and naval bombardment and an airborne assault—the landing of 24,000 British, US, and Canadian airborne troops shortly after midnight. Allied infantry and armoured divisions began landing on the coast of France at 06:30. The target 50-mile (80 km) stretch of the Normandy coast was divided into five sectors: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword Beach. Strong winds blew the landing craft east of their intended positions, particularly at Utah and Omaha. The men landed under heavy fire from gun emplacements overlooking the beaches, and the shore was mined and covered with obstacles such as wooden stakes, metal tripods, and barbed wire, making the work of the beach clearing teams difficult and dangerous. Casualties were heaviest at Omaha, with its high cliffs. At Gold, Juno, and Sword, several fortified towns were cleared in house-to-house fighting.

Le Mont-Saint-Michel

The island has held strategic fortifications since ancient times and since the 8th century AD has been the seat of the monastery from which it draws its name. The structural composition of the town exemplifies the feudal society that constructed it: on top, God, the abbey and monastery; below, the great halls; then stores and housing; and at the bottom, outside the walls, fishermen's and farmers' housing. Its unique position of being an island only 600 metres from land made it readily accessible at low tide to the many pilgrims to its abbey. Equally, this position made it readily defensible as an incoming tide stranded, drove off, or drowned, would-be assailants. By capitalizing on this natural defence the Mont remained unconquered during the Hundred Years' War with a small garrison successfully defending it against a full attack by the English in 1433.[2] The reverse benefits of its natural defence were not lost on Louis XI, who turned the Mont into a prison. Thereafter the abbey began to be used more regularly as a jail during the Ancien Régime. One of France's most recognizable landmarks, Mont Saint-Michel and its bay are part of the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites[3] and more than 3 million people visit it each year.[4]